Wildfire

Becoming Fire Wise

Resources

Resist Wildfire NC

North Carolina Forest Service

FireWise USA  — Being FireWise begins with you.

FireWise UAS Map — Locations of FireWise communities throughout the US

Homeowner/Community Resources — Steps to take to protect your home and assess risk

National Wildfire Coordinating Group

Plant Selector Easy-to-use tool for selecting plants for use in fire-prone communities

Haywood County GIS

 

A Fire-Resistant Home

The new “A Fire-Resistant Home” poster

features 10 Landscaping Tips that any

homeowner or tenant can take to reduce

their homes’ risk of damage from wildfire.

A Fire-Resistant Home

The new “A Fire-Resistant Home” poster features 10 Landscaping Tips that any homeowner

or tenant can take to reduce their homes’ risk of damage from wildfire.

A Fire-Resistant Home

 

The new “A Fire-Resistant Home” poster features 10 Landscaping Tips that any homeowner or tenant can take to reduce their homes’ risk of damage from wildfire.

 

Vegetation Management

1. Home Ignition Zones

To increase your home’s chance of surviving a wildfire, choose fire-resistant building materials and limit the amount of flammable vegetation in the three home ignition zones. The zones include the IMMEDIATE ZONE (0-5 feet around the house), the INTERMEDIATE ZONE (5-30 feet), and the EXTENDED ZONE (30-100 feet.

Download: Reducing Wildfire Risks in the Home Ignition Zones

2. Landscaping and Maintenance

To reduce ember ignitions and fire spread, trim branches that overhang the home, porch, and deck and prune branches of large trees up to 6 to 10 feet (depending on their height) from the ground. Remove plants containing resigns, oils, and waxes. Use crushed stone or gravel instead of flammable mulches in the IMMEDIATE ZONE (0-5 feet around the house). Keep your landscape in good condition.

Fire Resistive Construction

Be Prepared

6. Emergency Responder Access

Ensure your home and neighborhood have legible and clearly marked street names and numbers. Driveways should be well-maintained, at least 12 feet wide with a vertical clearance of 15 feet for emergency vehicle access.

7. Take action BEFORE a fire

  • Develop, discuss, and practice an emergency action plan with everyone in your home. Include details for handling pets, large animals, and livestock.
  • Know two ways out of your neighborhood and have a predesignated meeting place.
  • Always evacuate if you feel it’s unsafe to stay – don’t wait to receive an emergency notification if you feel threatened from the fire.
  • Conduct an annual insurance policy checkup to adjust for local building costs, codes, and new renovations.
  • Create or update a home inventory to help settle claims faster.

3. Roofing and Vents

Class A fire-rated roofing products, such as composite shingles, metal, concrete, and clay tiles, offer the best protection. Inspect shingles or roof tiles and replace or repair those that are loose or missing to prevent ember penetration. Box in eaves, but provide ventilation to prevent condensation and mildew. Roof and attic vents should be screened to prevent ember entry. 

4. Deck and Porches

Never store flammable materials underneath decks or porches. Remove dead vegetation and debris from under decks and porches and between deck board joints.

5. Siding and Windows

Embers can collect in small nooks and crannies and ignite combustible materials; radiant heat from flames can crack windows. Use fire-resistant siding such as brick, fiber-cement, plaster, or stucco, and use dual-pane tempered glass windows.

Illustration depicting the home ign

Home Ignition Zones

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